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Transformers
(2007)
Album Cover Art
Co-Composed and Produced by:

Co-Composed by:
Lorne Balfe
Clay Duncan

Orchestrated by:
Bruce Fowler
Elizabeth Finch
Walt Fowler
Rick Giovinazzo
Penka Kouneva
Ken Kugler

Conducted by:
Nick Glennie-Smith
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Warner Brothers Records
(October 9th, 2007)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release. A song compilation album for the film was released several months prior.
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AWARDS
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if every variation of Hans Zimmer's proven summer blockbuster sound pumps you up, for Steve Jablonsky's Transformers score is built on that extremely familiar foundation.

Avoid it... if you expect any connection between this music and the theme song and associated motifs heard in the classic cartoon and 1986 film score.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #495
WRITTEN 11/14/07
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Jablonsky
Jablonsky
Transformers: (Steve Jablonsky) One of the greatest success stories for Hasbro in the 1980's was the Transformers cartoon and line of toys, spanning a short, but bright few seasons on television before an ambitious animated film in 1986 killed off too many of the show's beloved and most interesting characters to sustain fan interest (Marvel's comics would live on, though). The much hyped 2007 live action adaptation of the concept, created in a joint venture between Dreamworks and Paramount, met and exceeded everyone's expectations, drawing massive financial returns both in the theatres and on DVD. Identified by critics as a guilty pleasure due to its technical prowess and a relatively unique concept (20 years removed from its last gasps on television), Transformers gained new fans despite the film's long list of shortcomings. For casual viewers, the presence of the ridiculous humans in the story is likely an annoyance, for their contrived characters only serve to take attention away the alien robots; rarely has character development been so transparently forced. For fans of the original show, the legendary voice of Peter Cullen returning for narration duties and the role of Autobot leader Optimus Prime could be one of the only redeeming aspects of the film. Attempts by the scriptwriters to drop pieces of dialogue from the original show and movie into this adaptation, including the show's original taglines, will cause the rolling of eyes. So many of the characters have been altered from their original forms, now transforming with such frighteningly complex mechanics that the robots really don't resemble their machines of deception, that purists of the show are bound for some head-scratching. The blatant promotion of the upcoming Chevy Camaro, along with a slew of other General Motors products, caused significant dissatisfaction as well, proving like always that secretive governmental agencies drive black GMC Yukons. At least Megatron had the opportunity to tear the Pontiac Solstice, with its politically incorrect (but stereotypically correct) African American voice, into two pieces. Unfortunately, the Decepticon leader no longer transforms into a handgun... After all, we're trying to avoid promoting violence to our kids, right?

The music for the new Transformers adaptation has, like most aspects of the film, caused quite a stir. The 1986 film allowed composer Vince DiCola to extend the synthetic themes and motifs from the animated series into the feature, augmenting those familiar sounds with a memorable, octave-skipping theme in the bass region for the planet-eating villain Unicron. DiCola's hip, electronic score, along with an outstanding ensemble of vocal talents for the robots, helped Transformers: The Movie exude enough character consistent with the show to squarely place it in the concept's universe. The catchy title theme from the series was integrated, along with several consistently utilized motifs, directly into the underscore. And, as expected for the audience, a selection of rock songs was inserted as well. For the 2007 vision of Transformers by Michael Bay, the director would turn once again to composer Steve Jablonsky for the score, and every musical element you remember from the 1980's would be abandoned. Unlike the scriptwriters, who toyed with audiences with their inside jokes relating to the original series throughout the film, Jablonsky apparently took absolutely no inspiration from the franchise whatsoever. Instead, he obviously is a big fan of the career of his mentor, Hans Zimmer, whose music may as well have been temp-tracked into Transformers and left there. Rather than hearing some creative variants of the original show's main theme and related motifs, Jablonsky provides an intellectually deficient recapitulation of ideas heard in Zimmer's Batman Begins, Pirates of the Caribbean, Crimson Tide, and The Peacemaker, as well as Trevor Rabin's National Treasure, Deep Blue Sea and Armageddon, among others. With his solo career still undefined, Jablonsky owes most of the skepticism about his abilities to his collaboration with Media Ventures and Remote Control, with which he had been a Zimmer ghostwriter for several of the composer's major scores of the early 2000's. His score for Bay's The Island in 2005 closed with a version of Gladiator's "Now We Are Free" so similar in sound that Lisa Gerrard must have thought she missed a party at some point. And while even the most avid fans of Jablonsky's Transformers score will readily admit that the music is derivative of all the ones listed above, the problems with it are far more significant.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
1,124 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.83 Stars
***** 236 5 Stars
**** 201 4 Stars
*** 136 3 Stars
** 245 2 Stars
* 306 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

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COMMENTS
19 TOTAL COMMENTS
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FVSR Reviews Transformers
Brendan Cochran - July 13, 2014, at 6:50 a.m.
1 comment  (651 views)
Stupid Americans and their Transformers pornography
Marcato - June 26, 2010, at 4:34 p.m.
1 comment  (3471 views)
Wonderful, Enjoyable Score
Kurt - February 21, 2010, at 11:43 p.m.
1 comment  (1588 views)
Even the design of the CD is thoughtless
Richard Kleiner - October 12, 2009, at 10:44 p.m.
1 comment  (1533 views)
Jablonsky rules!   Expand >>
Nemanja Calic - December 24, 2007, at 1:33 p.m.
2 comments  (2490 views)
Newest: May 23, 2009, at 2:35 p.m. by
SoundtrackBoy
Just think of the checks he'll be cashing from NBC......
greg - November 29, 2007, at 10:12 a.m.
1 comment  (1716 views)
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 59:45
• 1. Autobots* (2:33)
• 2. Decepticons* (3:52)
• 3. The All Spark* (3:35)
• 4. Deciphering the Signal* (3:09)
• 5. Frenzy* (1:57)
• 6. Optimus* (3:16)
• 7. Bumblebee* (3:58)
• 8. Soccent Attack (2:07)
• 9. Sam at the Lake (2:00)
• 10. Scorponok* (4:57)
• 11. Cybertron (2:46)
• 12. Arrival to Earth* (5:27)
• 13. Witwicky (1:57)
• 14. Downtown Battle (1:33)
• 15. Sector 7 (2:05)
• 16. Bumblebee Captured (2:17)
• 17. You're a Soldier Now (3:28)
• 18. Sam on the Roof* (2:03)
• 19. Optimus vs. Megatron (4:00)
• 20. No Sacrifice, No Victory* (2:58)
* different from version in film

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes extensive credits, but no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2007-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Transformers are Copyright © 2007, Warner Brothers Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 11/14/07 (and not updated significantly since).
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