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Sneakers
(1992)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, and Produced by:

Sax Performed by:
Branford Marsalis

Orchestrated by:
Brad Dechter
Frank Bennett
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Columbia Records
(September 29th, 1992)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you seek perhaps James Horner's friendliest score, one that won't overwhelm you with its themes or performances, but does exude an affable charisma lacking in most of his dramatic works.

Avoid it... if Horner's light jazz theme in the score is only a brief respite from tired dramatic and action material that does foreshadow many later scores for the composer.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #642
WRITTEN 9/24/96, REVISED 9/10/08
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Horner
Horner
Sneakers: (James Horner) Touted as one of the first mainstream technology capers from modern Hollywood, Phil Alden Robinson's 1992 film Sneakers fell victim to its own self-confidence. Press kits for the film were the first ever to be issued on computer media, and the studio placed all its eggs in the basket of a stellar cast that ended up chewing on a screenplay that didn't live up to the concept's potential. Robert Redford leads a group of industrial espionage experts on a mission of securing a universal code breaker, but their intentions are sometimes mysterious. The quickly paced thriller offered classy, urban suspense and charm, balancing the hard edge of the technology with a sense of humor. Composer James Horner used the occasion to write one of his lesser sleeper hits, a score that has managed to endure better than many others of the era. Horner was at a point in his career when he produced several blockbuster scores that, despite immense popularity, had gained him little praise from critics and his peers. The years 1992 and 1993 were a time when the composer produced introverted scores more often than not; it was music that followed a philosophy of less-is-more that led to some arguable successes (Thunderheart) and some arguable disappointments (Patriot Games) for those fans who were accustomed to his grand styles of the late 1980's. In both quality and style, Sneakers fell somewhere in the middle. It didn't re-use substantial portions of Horner's other works, and introduced a few new techniques that would definitely inform some of his blockbuster hits later in the decade. It also took a few pages from the styles of Elmer Bernstein, Jerry Goldsmith, and Danny Elfman, but, in the end, it still represented the breaking of new ground. What Horner produced for Sneakers turned out to be a more snazzy and less tense version of Goldsmith's The Russia House, with Branford Marsalis once again providing attractive solos on the saxophone. Marsalis is advertised with a picture right on front of the score album's cover (along with the cast, strangely enough), however his role in the score isn't much more than one of secondary accompaniment. He brings life to Horner's simple sixteenth-note themes with his crisp, stylish performances, however, and aids in the upbeat memorability of the score long after the film has faded away.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
537 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.55 Stars
***** 182 5 Stars
**** 116 4 Stars
*** 109 3 Stars
** 78 2 Stars
* 52 1 Stars
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COMMENTS
3 TOTAL COMMENTS
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Alternative review at Movie Wave
Southall - August 20, 2017, at 12:56 p.m.
1 comment  (22 views)
horner on sneakers
Justin - November 3, 2006, at 6:51 p.m.
1 comment  (2584 views)
It could make your head explode!
Julio Gomez - May 24, 2006, at 11:36 a.m.
1 comment  (2480 views)
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 48:27
• 1. Main Title (2:59)
• 2. "Too Many Secrets" (6:17)
• 3. The Sneakers Theme (3:34)
• 4. Cosmo... Old Friend (7:09)
• 5. The Hand-Off (3:07)
• 6. Planning the Sneak (3:22)
• 7. Playtronics Break-In (10:39)
• 8. The Escape/Whistler's Rescue (3:24)
• 9. Goodbye (3:24)
• 10. "...And the Blind Shall See" (4:29)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes minimal credits and no extra information about the film or score. There are no track listings provided on the exterior.
Copyright © 1996-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Sneakers are Copyright © 1992, Columbia Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 9/24/96 and last updated 9/10/08.
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