SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Jurassic World
    2. Tomorrowland
   3. San Andreas
  4. Mad Max: Fury Road
 5. Avengers: Age of Ultron
6. Cinderella
   BEST OF JAMES HORNER (1953-2015):
         1. Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan
        2. Willow
       3. The Land Before Time
      4. Glory
     5. Legends of the Fall
    6. Apollo 13
   7. Titanic
  8. The Legend of Zorro
 9. Avatar
10. The Amazing Spider-Man
Home Page
Moulin Rouge
(2001)
Album Cover Art
2001 Commercial Album
2002 Commercial Album
Album 2 Cover Art
2002 Promo Album
Album 3 Cover Art
Score Composed, Produced, and Performed on Piano by:

Songs Arranged and Produced by:
Craig Armstrong
Marius Devries
Josh G. Abrahams
Baz Luhrmann
Anton Monsted
Patrick Leonard
Steve Sharples
Steve Sidwell
Chris Elliot

Orchestrated by:
Craig Armstrong
Matt Dunkey

Score and Songs Conducted by:
Christopher Gordon
Cecilia Weston
Chris Elliot

Performed by:
London Orchestra

Metro Voices

Sydney Symphony Orchestra

Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Choir Conducted by:
Jenny O'Grady

Principle Vocals by:
Nicole Kidman
Ewan McGregor
Jim Broadbent
John Leguizamo
Jacek Koman
Richard Roxburgh
Anthony Weigh
Caroline O'Connor
Alka Yagnik

Albums Produced by:
Baz Luhrmann
Labels Icon
LABELS & RELEASE DATES
Interscope Records
(Volume 1)
(May 8th, 2001)

Promotional Release
(January, 2002)

Interscope Records
(Volume 2)
(February 26th, 2002)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
The two commercial albums are regular international releases. The promotional album was produced during the awards season of December 2001 to January 2002 and experienced only a limited printing due to the score's lack of an Academy Award eligibility. It was never available in quantity at even the online soundtrack specialty outlets. Original copies of the promo will have the "Moulin Rouge" logo in red at the top and "Craig Armstrong" written in cursive on the bottom of the CD itself. On the inner-circle is the name and phone number of the management group (Blue Focus) that pressed the CD.
Awards
AWARDS
The score won a Golden Globe and a BAFTA Award. The song "Come What May" was also nominated for a Golden Globe. The first album was nominated for a Grammy Award. Armstrong won the "Best Composer" award from AFI as well.

The score and songs were deemed ineligible for Oscar nominations from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences because they contain too little original material.
Also See Icon
ALSO SEE




Decorative Nonsense
PRINTER FRIENDLY VIEW
(inverts site colors)



20th Century Fox's Legal Threat to Filmtracks Over This Review
Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Full Credits
Buy it... on the DVD if you want to experience the musical in its most complete and intended form, a necessity given the stunning complexity of the music, both original and adapted, arranged meticulously for the picture.

Avoid it... on any and all of the albums if you seek a truly comprehensive and satisfying listening experience from the most outrageously entertaining musical of the Digital Age.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #7
WRITTEN 2/27/02, REVISED 1/7/09
Armstrong
Armstrong
Moulin Rouge: (Craig Armstrong/Various) Before commencing discussion about the music for Moulin Rouge in this review, it should be mentioned that Twentieth Century Fox threatened Filmtracks with legal action over this coverage in March of 2002. Through their law partners, Keats, McFarland & Wilson, LLP, Fox stated in a cease and desist letter that Filmtracks must immediately remove select elements of the coverage pertaining to composer Craig Armstrong's promotional album for Moulin Rouge. This site complied by taking the basic minimum of required action to avoid further claims (from which it would not have the resources to protect itself), removing the audio clips from the promotional album from this page. To view a copy of their original letter, as well as Filmtracks' response, click on the link above this review. It should be added, in retrospect, that the hassle caused by this legal threat contributed significantly to Filmtracks' decision to discontinue the "Theme of the Month" articles that had been part of the site since its creation in 1996. The studio's extremely poor attempts to contact the site before engaging its attorneys in the matter also caused the complete termination of all joint promotional efforts between Filmtracks and Fox, whether relating to album coverage consideration or other, singular endeavors. All known Internet IP addresses belonging to Fox corporate offices were banned from viewing the site and, as of the time of this revision to the Moulin Rouge review in January of 2009, relations between Filmtracks and Fox have not normalized. While this refusal by Filmtracks to deal with Fox has led to voluntary delays or outright rejection of reviews of promotional material sent to the site by Fox subsidiaries in subsequent years, there remains no excuse for the studio's behavior in 2002. Conversely, Filmtracks has worked diligently to repair its relationship with the representatives of Craig Armstrong, who were unjustly caught in the middle of the original problem because of their efforts to push for award nominations on behalf of their client. As a result, Filmtracks is proud to continue strongly featuring Armstrong's music, and, as is apparent from the review you are about to read, none of this trouble with Fox has affected the opinion about the outstanding music for Moulin Rouge.

No film of 2001 caused more excitement and controversy than Baz Luhrmann's strikingly unique postmodern musical. It's a dazzling spectacle of quick edits, flashy costumes, and breathtaking lights that enchanted some viewers with its beauty and sent others flying out of the theatre doors to confess their sins at the nearest church. The movie polarized audiences more than any other in the recent history of film, and it proved very difficult to predict which audiences would eventually see it for the fourth time and which would stagger out and lose their lunch in the lobby. The phenomenon that the film quickly became led it down a high profile road to dominate the awards show nominations of 2001 even though it was released far earlier in the year than any of the other major contenders. Both the DVD and commercial soundtrack albums representing the film have been outstanding successes, too, solidifying the somewhat awkward concept into a top place in the long ranks of Hollywood's best musicals (and opening the door for Chicago to overwhelm voters in the following awards season). There really is no adequate justice that a textual review of the music for Moulin Rouge (or a review of the movie itself, for that matter) can serve. The construction of the film and its music is so frenetic and choppy, shifting constantly between layers of musical ideas, that it's impossible for this review to fully explain each of the songs and score cues in a way that would make sense for someone who hasn't witnessed the package as a whole. To understand its parts, you simply need to have seen the sum. You also need to throw away your memories of the old, original Moulin Rouge movie from decades ago; the Baz Luhrmann version of 2001 wipes the slate clean and presents the story from an entirely different perspective. The director's previous extravaganzas (including the popular Strictly Ballroom and William Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet) featured storytelling in its most frenzied form, with MTV-like cuts, bizarre camera angles, and a marvelous sonic array to go with the swirling visuals. The complex choreography of the dancing in this film, when combined with Luhrmann's shooting techniques, forms a sort of 21st Century variation of the classic Busby Berkeley musicals of the 1930's. Much of the film's story is told through the lyrics of the nearly constant songs, regardless of whether or not dancing is involved.

Instead of hiring a composer to write original songs for Moulin Rouge, Luhrmann decided to enhance the postmodern aspect of the concept by mostly adapting famous songs from the past for placement in this new context. The allure of Moulin Rouge for many viewers exists in the fact that the songs chosen for the film don't even all come from musicals themselves. Most of them are rock songs from the previous two decades that have been converted into a fully orchestral musical form. The familiarity of the songs makes the orgy of Luhrmann's sets, costumes, and half-naked dancers even more disparate for the 1899 Parisian locale of the story. Still, the equation works. One of the most significant reasons for the success of Moulin Rouge was the training and editing of the actors' performances to assist them in sounding quite accomplished. Compared to Andrew Lloyd Webber's 2004 film version of The Phantom of the Opera, which annihilated the underlying composition with terrible vocal performances by novices, the work done to prepare the actors for this production was extremely effective, as was the editing of individual stanzas to link portions of the songs into coherent presentations. The most surprising of those vocal performances come from the film's two main costars. Ewan McGregor plays the young English poet named Christian who travels against his parents' wishes to live the lifestyle of a Bohemian in Paris at the turn of the 20th Century. Quickly swallowed by the steamy underworld of drugs, sex, and the brilliant new discovery known as electricity, the poet is washed into the infamous Moulin Rouge club. In a comical case of mistaken identity, Christian meets and falls in love with Satine (Nicole Kidman), the city's most famous courtesan. From there, the high wire, tragic romance is played out on the stage of the club, with full productions, villainous dukes, and heartbreaking backstabbing leading to an ultimately doomed conclusion set within a circular storytelling format. The large scale dance scenes set in the club's theatre allow for some remarkably huge production numbers in the musical, while the more enchanting love affair between the poet and courtesan provide countless opportunities to integrate the sappiest of love songs from the last fifty years into magnificent medleys. The world of the Moulin Rouge is fascinating enough simply with its mingling of aristocrats and Bohemians, but Luhrmann's infusion of outrageous musical pieces into the storytelling caused the film to become more eclectic than many movie-goers could handle.

Christian In short, Moulin Rouge is a film to which you shouldn't have taken your children or your bibles. Ironically, the crazed edits and psychotic illumination weren't the aspect of the film that caused many fans to object so much to it. Instead, disdain existed over the combination of that visual wizardry with the adaptation of the old songs. The selection of songs included those that ranged from two years to a hundred years old, so nearly every generation of viewer was likely to recognize a whole slew of songs that had been severely mangled (in most circumstances) to tell the story of Moulin Rouge. To accomplish his vision, Luhrmann hired his previous associate, composer Craig Armstrong, to coordinate the massive orchestral effort, and Marius DeVries to direct the use of adapted music throughout the film. In the billing for Moulin Rouge, Armstrong usually gets the sole recognition, for it was his extensive arrangement and production that led to the fantastic renditions of many of the classic songs in the film, as well as the straight composition of the underscore for the few scenes where a song was not logistically possible. Armstrong, on the periphery of the film score writing industry for the entirety of his career, had been gaining recognition across the world for his orchestral and choral compositions for movies over the course of the late 1990's, and his extensive involvement with Moulin Rouge gained him invaluable awards recognition. The fact that he didn't translate this monumental success into a more high profile international career over the subsequent decade is a disappointment, but that doesn't detract in any way from his achievements for this one project. He led a group of a dozen producers, arrangers, orchestrators, and conductors in an effort to utilize the best of his available resources while, at the same time, coordinating sounds that formed a cohesive whole for the production. Pieces were assembled in London, Sydney, and Melbourne, making the project an even more complex international mix and match endeavor. Armstrong also contributed by performing on the piano for some of the orchestral renditions of key songs. Despite Armstrong's dominance at the Golden Globe and BAFTA awards that year, taking home the "best score" award at both venues, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in America determined that Moulin Rouge contained too little original material and thus deemed it ineligible for not only its songs, but its score as well (of course, that didn't stop the same group from nominating and awarding Gustavo Santaolalla's Babel a few years later).

Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
39,363 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 4.17 Stars
***** 23,909 5 Stars
**** 7,680 4 Stars
*** 2,443 3 Stars
** 1,352 2 Stars
* 3,979 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

Comments Icon
COMMENTS
260 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments
Promotional Album?
Thomas Lucy - January 16, 2013, at 6:27 p.m.
1 comment  (983 views)
bolero and come what may...
luxor - November 20, 2008, at 9:40 a.m.
1 comment  (3799 views)
el tango de roxanne score?   Expand >>
andrea - April 16, 2007, at 7:14 p.m.
2 comments  (4904 views)
Newest: April 16, 2007, at 7:17 p.m.by andrea
ELEPHANT LOVE MIDLEY
Patrick - July 7, 2006, at 4:26 p.m.
1 comment  (1946 views)
can anyone help me out here??   Expand >>
alex - March 17, 2006, at 11:04 p.m.
1 comment  (2845 views)
Moulin Rouge - film score
M.Jelf - February 12, 2006, at 10:25 a.m.
1 comment  (2743 views)
More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
First Commercial Album: Tracks   ▼Total Time: 56:59
• 1. Nature Boy (3:25)
   David Bowie
• 2. Lady Marmalade (4:24)
   Christina Aguilera/Pink/Mya/Lil' Kim
• 3. Because We Can (3:27)
   Fatboy Slim/Jim Broadbent
• 4. Sparkling Diamonds (2:52)
   Nicole Kidman/Jim Broadbent/Caroline O'Connor/Natalie Mandoza/Lara Mulcahy
• 5. Rhythm of the Night (3:49)
   Valeria
• 6. Your Song (3:38)
   Ewan McGregor/Alessandro Safina
• 7. Children of the Revolution (2:59)
   Bono/Gavin Friday/Maurice Seezer
• 8. One Day I'll Fly Away (3:18)
   Nicole Kidman
• 9. Diamond Dogs (4:34)
   Beck/Timbaland
• 10. Elephant Love Medley (4:13)
   Ewan McGregor/Nicole Kidman/Jamie Allen
• 11. Come What May (4:48)
   Ewan McGregor/Nicole Kidman
• 12. Le Tango de Roxanne (4:43)
   Ewan McGregor/Jose Feliciano/Jacek Koman
• 13. Compliante de la Butte (3:05)
   Rufus Wainwright
• 14. Hindi Sad Diamonds (3:28)
   Nicole Kidman/John Leguizamo/Alka Yagnik
• 15. Nature Boy (4:08)
   David Bowie/Massive Attack
Second Commercial Album: Tracks   ▼Total Time: 42:52
Promotional Album: Tracks   ▼Total Time: 42:01

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The inserts of the two commercial albums contain extensive credits for each track, but include no information about the score or film. No Lyrics are provided either. The promotional album has sparse packaging, with only a track list and minimal artwork. When you see "BLAM" listed in the musical production credits, that is an acronym for the names Baz Luhrmann and Anton Monsted.


Full Production Credits for All Adapted Music:
(Contains all songs in chronological order as heard in the film)

    The Meeting • "Nature Boy"
       Written by: Eden Ahbez
       Performed by: David Bowie, John Leguizamo
       Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams and Craig Armstrong

    • "Compliante de la Butte"
       Music by: Georges Van Parys
       Lyrics by: Jean Renoir
       Performed by: Rufus Wainwright
       Produced by: Michel Pepin and Rufus Wainwright
       Rufus Wainwright performs courtesy of Dreamworks Records

    • "Children of the Revolution"
       Written by: Marc Bolan
       Performed by: Marius Devries
       Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams and Marius DeVries

    • "The Sound of Music"
       Written by: Richard Rodgers & Oscar Hammerstein II
       Performed by: Ewan McGregor
       Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams and Marius DeVries

    • "Children of the Revolution"
       Written by: Marc Bolan
       Performed by: Ewan McGregor, Jacek Koman, John Leguizamo, Garry MacDonald, Kylie Minogue, Ozzy Osbourne, and Matthew Whittet
       Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams and Marius DeVries
       Kylie Minogue performs courtesy of Parlophone Records and Festival Mushroom Records
       Ozzy Osbourne performs courtesy of Epic Records

    • "Zidler's Rap (Medley)"
       Featuring:

      • "Zidler's Rap"
         Written by: Baz Luhrmann, Craig Pearce and Marius DeVries
         Performed by: Jim Broadbent
         Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams and Marius DeVries
      • "Lady Marmalade"
         Written by: Bob Crewe and Kenny Nolan
         Performed by: Christina Aguilera, Lil' Kim, Mya and Pink
         Produced by: Missy Elliott for Mass Confusion Productions, Inc. and Rockwilder for F-5 Productions, Inc.
         Christina Aguilera performs courtesy of The RCA Music Group
         Lil' Kim performs courtesy of Queen Bee Entertainment, Inc./Undeas/Atlantic Recording Corporation
         Mya performs courtesy of A&M Records
         Pink performs courtesy of Laface Records
      • "Smells Like Teen Spirit"
         Written by: Kurt Cobain, Chris Novoselic and Dave Grohl
         Produced by: Danny Saber
      • "Because We Can"
         Written by: Norman Cook
         Performed and Produced by: Fatboy Slim
         Fatboy Slim performs courtesy of Astralwerks/Skint Records

    • "Sparkling Diamonds (Medley)"
       Featuring:

      • "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend"
         Written by: Jule Styne and Leo Robin
         Performed by: Nicole Kidman, Jim Broadbent, Natalie Mendoza, Lara Mulcahy and Caroline O'Connor
         Natalie Mendoza performs courtesy of EMI Music Australia Pty (Limited)
         Produced by Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams, Craig Armstrong, and Marius DeVries
      • "Material Girl"
         Written by: Peter H. Brown and Robert S. Rans
         Performed by: Nicole Kidman, Natalie Mendoza, Lara Mulcahy and Caroline O'Connor
         Natalie Mendoza performs courtesy of EMI Music Australia Pty (Limited)
         Produced by Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams, Craig Armstrong, and Marius DeVries

    • "Diamond Dogs"
       Written by: David Bowie
       Performed and Produced by: Beck and Timbaland
       Beck performs courtesy of Geffen Records

    • "Rhythm of the Night"
       Written by: Diane Warren
       Performed by: Valeria
       Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams, Marius DeVries, and Alexis Smith
       Valeria performs courtesy of Farmclub.com/Interscope Records

    • "Your Song"
       Written by: Elton John and Bernie Taupin
       Performed by: Ewan McGregor and Alessandro Safina
       Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams, Craig Armstrong, Marius DeVries, and Patrick Leonard

    • "Meet Me in the Red Room"
       Music by: Marius DeVries
       Lyrics by: Amiel
       Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams and Marius DeVries
       Amiel performs courtesy of Festival Mushroom Records

    • "Children of the Revolution"
       Written by: Marc Bolan
       Performed by: Bono, Gavin Friday and Maurice Seezer
       Produced by: Richard "Biff" Stannard, Julian Gallagher, Bono, Gavin Friday, and Maurice Seezer
       Bono performs courtesy of Universal-Island Records UK

    • "The Pitch (Medley)"
       Featuring:

      • "The Can Can from Orphee Aux Enfers"
         Music by: Jacques Offenbach
         The Pitch Can Can lyrics by: Baz Luhrmann and Craig Pearce

      • "The Sound of Music"
         Written by: Richard Rodgers & Oscar Hammerstein II
      • "Your Song"
         Written by: Elton John and Bernie Taupin
         Performed by: Nicole Kidman, Ewan McGregor, Jim Broadbent, Jacek Koman, John Leguizamo, Garry MacDonald, Richard Roxburgh, and Matthew Whittet
         Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams and Marius DeVries

    • "One Day I'll Fly Away (Medley)"
       Featuring:

      • "One Day I'll Fly Away"
         Written by: Will Jennings and Joe Sample
         Performed by: Nicole Kidman

      • "Your Song"
         Written by: Elton John and Bernie Taupin
         Performed by: Ewan McGregor
         Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams, Craig Armstrong, and Marius DeVries

      • "Love is Like Oxygen"
         Written by: Andrew Scott and Trevor Griffin
      • "Love is a Many Splendored Thing"
         Written by: Paul Francis Webster and Sammy Fain
      • "Gorecki"
         Written by: Andrew Barlow and Louise Rhodes
         Performed by: Nicole Kidman
         Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, and Josh G. Abrahams

    The Whores • "Elephant Love Medley"
       Featuring:

      • "All You Need is Love"
         Written by: John Lennon and Paul McCartney
      • "I Was Made for Lovin' You"
         Written by: Paul Stanley, Desmond Child, and Vini Poncia
      • "One More Night"
         Written by: Phil Collins
      • "Pride (In the Name of Love)"
         Written by: U2
         Lyrics by: Bono and The Edge

      • "Don't Leave Me This Way"
         Written by: Kenneth Gample, Leon Huff and Cary Gilbert
      • "Silly Love Songs"
         Written by: Paul McCartney
      • "Up Where We Belong"
         Written by: Jack Nitzsche, Buffy Sainte-Marie, and Will Jennings
      • "Heroes"
         Written by: David Bowie and Brian Eno
      • "I Will Always Love You"
         Written by: Dolly Parton
      • "Your Song"
         Written by: Elton John and Bernie Taupin
         Performed by: Nicole Kidman, Ewan McGregor and Jamie Allen
         Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams, Craig Armstrong, and Marius DeVries

    • "Come What May"
       Written by: David Baerwald
       Performed by: Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor
       Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams, Craig Armstrong, and Marius DeVries

    • "Like a Virgin"
       Written by: Billy Steinberg and Tom Kelly
       Performed by: Jim Broadbent, Richard Roxburgh and Anthony Weigh
       Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams, and Marius DeVries

    • "El Tango de Roxanne (Medley)"
       Featuring:

      • "Roxanne"
         Written by: Sting
         Performed by: Ewan McGregor, Jose Feliciano, Jacek Koman, and Richard Roxburgh
         Jose Feliciano performs courtesy of Universal Music Latino

      • "Le Tango du Moulin Rouge"
         Music by: Marianito Mores
         Lyrics by: Baz Luhrmann and Craig Pearce
         Performed by: Ewan McGregor, Jose Feliciano, Jacek Koman, and Richard Roxburgh
         Jose Feliciano performs courtesy of Universal Music Latino

      • "Come What May"
         Written by: David Baerwald
         Performed by: Nicole Kidman
         Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams, Craig Armstrong, and Marius DeVries

    • "Fool to Believe"
       Written by: Craig Armstrong, Baz Luhrmann, Craig Pearce, and Marius DeVries
       Performed by: Nicole Kidman
       Includes:
    "One Day I'll Fly Away"
       Written by: Will Jennings and Joe Sample
       Performed by: Nicole Kidman and Jim Broadbent
       Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Craig Armstrong, and Marius DeVries

    • "The Show Must Go On"
       Written by: Freddie Mercury, Brian May, Roger Taylor and John Deacon
       Performed by: Nicole Kidman, Jim Broadbent, and Anthony Weigh
       Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Josh G. Abrahams, Craig Armstrong, and Marius DeVries

    • "Hindi Sad Diamonds (Medley)"
       Featuring:

      • "Chamma Chamma"
         Written by: Sameer
         Performed by: Alka Yagnik
         Song licenced courtesy of Dashmesh International Ltd.

      • "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend"
         Written by: Jule Styne and Leo Robin
         Performed by: Nicole Kidman
         Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Marius DeVries, and Steve Sharples

      • "The Hindi"
         Written by: Steve Sharples
         Performed by: John Leguizamo
         Produced by: Baz Luhrmann, Anton Monsted, Marius DeVries, and Steve Sharples

    • "Nature Boy"
       Written by: Eden Ahbez
       Performed by: David Bowie and Massive Attack
       Produced by: Robert "3D" Del Naja, Neil Davidge, and Craig Armstrong
       Massive Attack performs courtesy of Virgin Records America, Inc./Virgin Records Limited

    • "Bolero" - Closing Credits
       Written and Produced by: Steve Sharples
       Solo Violin by: Simon Standage


    • Musical score features parts of:

      • "Gaite Parisienne"
         Written by: Jacques Offenbach
         Arranged by: Manuel Rosenthal

      • "Golden Bowls"
         Written and performed by: Richard Karma Moffett
         Courtesy of Padma Tapes

      • "The Lonely Goatherd"
         Written by: Richard Rodgers & Oscar Hammerstein II
      • "Nature Boy"
         Written by: Eden Ahbez
      • "One Day I'll Fly Away"
         Written by: Will Jennings and Joe Sample
      • "Tanguera"
         Written by: Marianito Mores
      • "Voyage to the Moon"
      • "Orpheus in the Underworld"
         Written by: Jacques Offenbach
      • "Your Song"
         Written by: Elton John and Bernie Taupin
Copyright © 2002-2015, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Moulin Rouge are Copyright © 2001, 2002, Interscope Records (Volume 1), Promotional Release, Interscope Records (Volume 2) and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 2/27/02 and last updated 1/7/09.
"Does that inspire you?"
Reviews Preload Scoreboard decoration Ratings Preload Composers Preload Awards Preload Home Preload Search Preload