SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   NEWEST MAJOR REVIEWS:
     1. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
    2. Moana
   3. Fantastic Beasts/Find Them
  4. Arrival
 5. Doctor Strange
6. Inferno


   CURRENT BEST-SELLING SCORES:
       1. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
      2. Fantastic Beasts/Find Them
     3. Willow
    4. The Ghost and the Darkness
   5. An American Tail
  6. The Wind and the Lion
 7. Doctor Strange
8. 10 Cloverfield Lane
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Star Wars: Force Awakens
        2. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
       3. Titanic
      4. Avatar
     5. Nineteen Eighty-Four
    6. Gladiator
   7. Star Wars: A New Hope
  8. Animal Farm
 9. LOTR: Fellowship of the Ring
10. Harry Potter: Sorcerer's Stone
Home Page
The Mist
(2007)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Produced by:

Performed by:
The Sodden Dog Electronic Arts Society
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(January 15th, 2008)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
Also See Icon
ALSO SEE




Decorative Nonsense
PRINTER FRIENDLY VIEW
(inverts site colors)





   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you seek an adaptation of the Lisa Gerrard performance of the Dead Can Dance song "The Host of Seraphim" that dominates the soundtrack on screen and on album with its seven minutes of downbeat, spiritual beauty.

Avoid it... if you expect absolutely anything remotely listenable to come from Mark Isham's synthetic original music for this film, because it functions as unnerving sound effects to maintain a horrific ambience of dread for a small portion of the film.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,788
WRITTEN 11/24/10
Shopping Icon
BUY IT



Isham
Isham
The Mist: (Mark Isham) Several directors have tried to convincingly adapt Stephen King's straight horror stories through the years, most of them failing to rise above the low expectations that accompany cheap scare tactic flicks of the genre. Ironically, among the best of them was Frank Darabont's The Mist in 2007, yet the film's rather disappointing box office performance defied widespread critical praise. While Darabont's previous King adaptations, The Shawshank Redemption and The Green Mile, were targeted at mainstream sensibilities, The Mist is absolute and pure horror. The plot involves a government experiment to open a portal into another dimension, and when a violent thunderstorm strikes the Maine community (of course!) by which this experiment is in progress, a fog full of terrible creatures is unleashed upon the region. Most of the protagonists are trapped in a supermarket by the fog and are picked off one by one by wretched monsters as they venture outside in a quest for survival. The story concentrates mostly on the psychological changes that ordinary people will experience in bizarre circumstances, yielding predictable intrusions of religious zealotry that are inevitable in such fearful situations. But Darabont's altered conclusion, made with the approval of King, gives the film such a sour ending and defies all realistic notions of parental love (the latter is truly inexcusable and possibly proves that Darabont would make a piss poor parent himself) that The Mist dissolves into a laughably melodramatic, gut-wrenching "gotcha" type of dissatisfying story. The director had been pondering the production of The Mist for many years, and he had always known precisely what direction he planned to take with its music. He wanted the film to have a documentary feel in many of its parts, therefore opting to leave the mass majority of The Mist without any music at all. "Sometimes movie music feels false," he said in 2007. "I've always felt that silent can be scarier than loud, a whisper more frightening than a bang, and we wanted to create a balance." The only musical aspect he had long sought was the inclusion of the Dead Can Dance song "The Host of Seraphim" for the devastating moments of revelation in the picture. The song's downbeat religious aspect, courtesy Lisa Gerrard's resoundingly spiritual but eerily otherworldly vocals, is so strikingly different from the otherwise low key musical approach in The Mist that it can't help but make a profound impact. Whether or not it can salvage a troubling album for the original score is another matter.



Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
77 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.32 Stars
***** 6 5 Stars
**** 11 4 Stars
*** 12 3 Stars
** 21 2 Stars
* 27 1 Stars
  (View results for all titles)

Comments Icon
COMMENTS
0 TOTAL COMMENTS
Read All Start New Thread Search Comments


No Comments

More...


Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 32:03
• 1. Won't Somebody See a Lady Home? (1:24)
• 2. Tentacles (3:18)
• 3. Bugs (7:49)
• 4. Mist (1:32)
• 5. Spiders (4:26)
• 6. Explation (2:24)
• 7. The Host of Seraphim* (7:19)
• 8. The Vicious Blues (from Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle) (3:48)
* performed by Dead Can Dance and including additional material by Mark Isham

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2010-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Mist are Copyright © 2008, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 11/24/10 (and not updated significantly since).
Reviews Preload Scoreboard decoration Ratings Preload Composers Preload Awards Preload Home Preload Search Preload